Click here to return to the Flower Garden News home page. SAVING YOUR OWN SEEDS

Read information on collecting, drying,
and storing seeds from your own flowers.
Featured Articles
Starting seeds indoors
Read information on how to sow seeds indoors.
Makes a great hobby. Get a head start this Spring!
Click Here to Read More
Pile of Marigolds seeds from only one season of collecting the seeds.
This picture is from one summer's harvest
of Marigold seeds. The original seed was
given to me by my Father 5 years ago.
This pile of Marigold seeds measures
about 5 inches high!
Visit my Paper Meadows to see
New Life for the Next Garden.
SAVING YOUR OWN SEEDS
If you'd like to collect seeds from your flower gardens here is a basic method I use to save my seeds.

Step 1  Getting started:
Throughout the growing season I allow flowers to go to seed; producing seed heads or seed pods.
Than I let the seed heads dry out as much as possible while still on the plant. Weather permitting of
course.

Step 2   Collecting seeds:
Before the pods break open, are eaten by birds, or risk of frost and winter weather starts I will collect the
dried seed pods from the plants on a dry sunny day. I carefully cut or break off the seed heads from the
plants with a container in the other hand to catch any seeds or seed pods  that may fall. If collecting
seeds from many different plants at once; it is a good idea to collect them in separate envelopes or
containers with a quick label for each to remind yourself what seed is from what plant!

Step 3   Drying seeds:
After collecting the seeds I usually place them in a ventilated box or container to dry out completely. I
keep the box outside in a warm and dry spot. So if drying outside try to keep them protected from wind,
wet weather, and rodents. Some seeds will dry out faster than others. I always make sure that any
seeds that I'm ready to store are completely dry. This prevents rotting and minimizes the possibility of
mold.
Step 4 Preparing seeds for storage:
When seeds are good and dry I shake the seeds and pods through a mini
screen, or sieve. I give them a gentle "crush" onto the screen and gently
shake this over a white piece of paper. The screen usually holds most of
the  seed pods, and chaffs allowing the seed to fall through onto the paper.
Step 5   Storing seeds:
I simply use paper envelopes to store my seeds. Labeling is important.
Label envelopes with the date and year collected as well as the name of the plant. It is a good idea to
store envelopes in a cool dry area. I store my seed collection in the laundry room. I also store some
seeds outside in the garden shed over winter. If storing seeds outside remember to place envelopes
in a rodent proof container such as a metal can with lid. An old washed out paint can with lid works
great.
The seed's success depends on how old it is, and it's storing conditions. That is not to say that my
seeds have not been stored for more than one year. I have done so. I do try to plant seeds I have
collected right from the previous year for best results in the garden. Although, I have had successful
plantings with older seeds. If I become overloaded with seeds, I just give them away to friends.

To keep my seed supply fresh and plentiful, I always collect, dry and store new seeds every year.
Supplies for seed saving:

Small old window screen or sieve.

A variety of sizes of paper envelopes.

Ventilated cardboard box or container.

A selection of small containers for catching, collecting,
and drying seeds in.

Scrap pieces of white paper.

Old, washed out paint can with lid for rodent proof
storage.

Pens for labeling.
Favorite flowers to collect seeds from:


Corn Poppy

Cosmo

Cupid's Dart

French Marigold

Zinnia

Tomatoes
Privacy Policy


GARDENING TOPICS

BASIC GARDENING
CONTAINER GARDENING
SEED SAVING
STARTING SEEDS INDOORS
GARDEN PESTS
GARDENER'S CALENDAR
GARDENER'S DICTIONARY


INTERACTIVE GARDENING

A GARDENING GRAPEVINE-
AT PAPER MEADOWS

ENTER TIPS AND STORIES
READ HOME GARDEN TIPS
READ GARDEN STORIES


FLOWERS AND PLANTS

FLOWER AND PLANT GUIDE
ANNUALS
PERENNIALS


GARDENING FUN

PRINTABLE PHOTOS
PHOTO GALLERY
HOME GARDEN CONTESTS
CONTEST WINNERS
FLOWERS FOR CRAFTS
FOUND GARDEN TREASURES
FLOWER OF THE MONTH


KID'S GARDENING

KID'S GARDENING
KID'S GARDEN PHOTOS


GENERAL INFORMATION

SHOPPING ON THE INTERNET
ADVERTISING SPACE
SITE MAP
ARTICLE ARCHIVES
HOME
Scenic picture of rooted hiking path. Click here to print.
Nature picture of  rabbit in the garden. Click here to print.
Seed Saving-
As a gardener one of my most favorite gardening tasks is collecting,
drying, and saving seeds from my own flower garden all summer long.
I would like to refer to this gardening task as a therapeutic hobby.
Especially in Fall; for I find it relaxing and provides me hope with
anticipation that another spring will soon be here and I know I'll be in the
garden once again.

I personally keep seed saving simple. I collect seeds from favorite
flowers for next year's gardens. I mostly choose annual and perennial
plants that are known for keeping their characteristics each generation.
If wanting plants that will breed true, collect seeds from single species
that are growing away from other colors of that plant or plant species.
This will minimize the chances of collecting a seed that may have been
cross-pollinated. Sometimes I will collect seeds from plants or flowers
for the element of surprise. If they grow when I plant them, I'm very
pleased. If they don't; nothing is lost.

I enjoy sharing seeds with friends and other gardeners. I have also
found uses for seeds, dried flower petals, and leaves when doing nature
crafts. Gardeners save seeds for different reasons. Collecting seeds
from your flower gardens saves money and is the most economical way
to produce many new plants for your gardens year after year.
It also preserves a favourite plant that may not be available one day.
This assures that you can keep planting that same plant for years to
come. Many gardeners enjoy collecting seeds and giving their favourites
as a gift to other gardeners.

I have been pleased with the amount of seeds I have collected, and the
many healthy, successful plants that grow from these seeds!

Keep it simple and enjoy the harvesting of seeds for future gardens.
Papaver rhoeas

Cosmos bipinnatus

Catananche caerulea

Tagetes patula

Zinnia elegans
Printable Photos

Have some fun with gardening and check out some
pictures.
  Click Here to see photos
FLOWER GARDEN NEWS
______________________________________

The Flower Garden News Menu.
Click here to visit the Flower Garden News site map.
Keep it growing.
Pass Flower Garden News
on to Friends and Family.
Garden Menu